Colorado’s native razorback sucker making a comeback

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Colorado’s native razorback sucker making a comeback

Fish and Wildlife considers reclassifying to threatened status
Underwater photo of razorback suckers in the Colorado River.
Albert Lapahie, a wildlife technician with the Navajo Nation Department of Fish and Wildlife, holds a razorback sucker that used the fish passage at the Public Service Co. of New Mexico weir on the San Juan River. The passage has allowed 22 razorbacks, 29 Colorado pikeminnows and more than 87,000 other native fish to move upstream since 2003.
Ron Rogers biologist with Biowest Inc., holds a large razorback sucker captured in Lake Mead near the Colorado River inflow area.

Colorado’s native razorback sucker making a comeback

Underwater photo of razorback suckers in the Colorado River.
Albert Lapahie, a wildlife technician with the Navajo Nation Department of Fish and Wildlife, holds a razorback sucker that used the fish passage at the Public Service Co. of New Mexico weir on the San Juan River. The passage has allowed 22 razorbacks, 29 Colorado pikeminnows and more than 87,000 other native fish to move upstream since 2003.
Ron Rogers biologist with Biowest Inc., holds a large razorback sucker captured in Lake Mead near the Colorado River inflow area.
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