Unwanted in the West

Unwanted in the West

Presence of outlaws, Indians, Catholics delayed statehood for N.M., Arizona
Andrew Gulliford/Special to the Journal



An American flag graces a doorway in Tierra Amarilla, Rio Arriba County, N.M. In 1912 New Mexico achieved statehood with a constitution that gave Spanish equal stature with English as an official language.
Andrew Gulliford/Special to the Journal



A saguaro sunset in southern Arizona, the 48th state, typifies the desert Southwest – now a haven for retirees from across the United States and Canada.
Andrew Gulliford/Special to the Journal



The presence of Native Americans in the Southwest delayed statehood for Arizona and New Mexico until 1912. Now both states embrace Indian heritage and traditions. Master weaver Virginia Deal’s Two Grey Hills rugs, whose colors reflect the actual sheep’s wool, use no artificial dyes.
Andrew Gulliford/Special to the Journal



The value of gold, silver, copper and coal mines helped bring New Mexico into the union. At Mogollon, New Mexico miners’ cabins and a solid metal head frame from a once-productive mine stand abandoned.
Andrew Gulliford/Special to the Journal



The iconic Catholic mission of San Xavier del Bac, south of Tucson, still serves the Tohono O’odham tribe. The prevalence of Catholicism in the Southwest helped delay statehood for both Arizona and New Mexico.

Unwanted in the West

Andrew Gulliford/Special to the Journal



An American flag graces a doorway in Tierra Amarilla, Rio Arriba County, N.M. In 1912 New Mexico achieved statehood with a constitution that gave Spanish equal stature with English as an official language.
Andrew Gulliford/Special to the Journal



A saguaro sunset in southern Arizona, the 48th state, typifies the desert Southwest – now a haven for retirees from across the United States and Canada.
Andrew Gulliford/Special to the Journal



The presence of Native Americans in the Southwest delayed statehood for Arizona and New Mexico until 1912. Now both states embrace Indian heritage and traditions. Master weaver Virginia Deal’s Two Grey Hills rugs, whose colors reflect the actual sheep’s wool, use no artificial dyes.
Andrew Gulliford/Special to the Journal



The value of gold, silver, copper and coal mines helped bring New Mexico into the union. At Mogollon, New Mexico miners’ cabins and a solid metal head frame from a once-productive mine stand abandoned.
Andrew Gulliford/Special to the Journal



The iconic Catholic mission of San Xavier del Bac, south of Tucson, still serves the Tohono O’odham tribe. The prevalence of Catholicism in the Southwest helped delay statehood for both Arizona and New Mexico.
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