Reservoir levels in Southwest Colorado are dropping fast

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Reservoir levels in Southwest Colorado are dropping fast

Narraguinnep is reduced to minimum pool; Groundhog also is low
Blue herons feed in the shallows of Narraguinnep Reservoir northwest of Dolores.
Narraguinnep Reservoir is down to the minimum pool, the lowest it has been in recent memory. Reservoirs across Southwest Colorado are suffering because of the weak winter snowpack and persistent drought.
McPhee Reservoir is nearing its inactive pool level, allowing the Dolores River to find its former channel.
Narraguinnep Reservoir has been drawn down to its minimum pool level because of the low-water year.
The Dolores River was flowing at 182 cubic feet per second on Wednesday. The increase is due to a release from Groundhog Reservoir, not the recent rains.
A dead crawfish and cracked earth on the nearly empty Narraguinnep Reservoir symbolyze the ongoing drought.

Reservoir levels in Southwest Colorado are dropping fast

Blue herons feed in the shallows of Narraguinnep Reservoir northwest of Dolores.
Narraguinnep Reservoir is down to the minimum pool, the lowest it has been in recent memory. Reservoirs across Southwest Colorado are suffering because of the weak winter snowpack and persistent drought.
McPhee Reservoir is nearing its inactive pool level, allowing the Dolores River to find its former channel.
Narraguinnep Reservoir has been drawn down to its minimum pool level because of the low-water year.
The Dolores River was flowing at 182 cubic feet per second on Wednesday. The increase is due to a release from Groundhog Reservoir, not the recent rains.
A dead crawfish and cracked earth on the nearly empty Narraguinnep Reservoir symbolyze the ongoing drought.
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