Fire retardant used on wildfires evolves to ease environmental impact

News

Fire retardant used on wildfires evolves to ease environmental impact

Chemicals in slurry have come a long way, Forest Service says
An air tanker drops fire retardant June 1, the first day of the 416 Fire. After an environmental review, the Forest Service changed protocols about where slurry can be dropped and also changed the fire retardant’s chemical composition to make it less harmful to the environment.

Fire retardant used on wildfires evolves to ease environmental impact

An air tanker drops fire retardant June 1, the first day of the 416 Fire. After an environmental review, the Forest Service changed protocols about where slurry can be dropped and also changed the fire retardant’s chemical composition to make it less harmful to the environment.

Fire retardant used on wildfires evolves to ease environmental impact

Fire retardant falls to the ground June 1, the first day of the 416 Fire. Slurry doesn’t douse flames. The retardant cools and coats fuels on the forest floor, depriving them of oxygen and slowing combustion.

Fire retardant used on wildfires evolves to ease environmental impact

Fire retardant covers a portion of the ground June 4 north of Durango. To protect native cutthroat trout populations, firefighters have avoided dropping slurry in Hermosa Creek, Clear Creek, East Fork and Big Bend.

Fire retardant used on wildfires evolves to ease environmental impact

A plane drops retardant on the top of the Hermosa Cliffs on June 7 while fighting the 416 Fire.
Reader Comments