Immigrants become part of San Luis Valley decades after arriving

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Immigrants become part of San Luis Valley decades after arriving

Decades after their arrival, a family is a key part of San Luis Valley
Sisters Anna and Alexandra Esquivel-Gaspar work on a coloring book after school at their home in Alamosa. All three of Lucia Gaspar’s children are U.S citizens, but she worries about their future if she or her husband, Javier, who is also undocumented, are deported.
Lucia Gaspar at work in Alamosa Middle School’s special needs classroom. She got the job through a program called Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals or DACA.
Lucia Gaspar watches her 10-year-old son, Erick Esquivel-Gaspar, at his soccer practice in May. With DACA, Gaspar has been able to find jobs that leave her more time for parenting.
Guatemalan products line the shelves of Tienda Latina Guate-Mex, on Alamosa’s Main Street. Immigrants from Guatemala’s Indigenous Mayan communities began arriving here more than 30 years ago as asylum-seekers from the Guatemalan civil war. Today, they form an important part of the town’s economic and cultural fabric.
Corey RobinsonThe interior of the Colorado Mushroom Farm, which relies almost entirely on immigrants who work sometimes 12- to 14-hour days at minimum wage. Before DACA, this was one of the only jobs available to Lucia Gaspar.

Immigrants become part of San Luis Valley decades after arriving

Sisters Anna and Alexandra Esquivel-Gaspar work on a coloring book after school at their home in Alamosa. All three of Lucia Gaspar’s children are U.S citizens, but she worries about their future if she or her husband, Javier, who is also undocumented, are deported.
Lucia Gaspar at work in Alamosa Middle School’s special needs classroom. She got the job through a program called Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals or DACA.
Lucia Gaspar watches her 10-year-old son, Erick Esquivel-Gaspar, at his soccer practice in May. With DACA, Gaspar has been able to find jobs that leave her more time for parenting.
Guatemalan products line the shelves of Tienda Latina Guate-Mex, on Alamosa’s Main Street. Immigrants from Guatemala’s Indigenous Mayan communities began arriving here more than 30 years ago as asylum-seekers from the Guatemalan civil war. Today, they form an important part of the town’s economic and cultural fabric.
Corey RobinsonThe interior of the Colorado Mushroom Farm, which relies almost entirely on immigrants who work sometimes 12- to 14-hour days at minimum wage. Before DACA, this was one of the only jobs available to Lucia Gaspar.
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